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Jalozai Camp, North West Frontier Province
February, 2009

Conflict between the Taliban and Pakistani military forces in the North West Frontier Province, including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, has led to a mass movement of internally displaced persons (IDPs) to host communities and camps in safer surrounding districts. The overall socio-economic indicators in the IDP camps are dismal, largely due to inadequate health facilities, insufficient education opportunities and poor hygiene and sanitation amenities, compounded with a host of protection issues. This EMMA pilot was conducted to investigate the effect of the IDP crisis on the tomato market system in Jalozai Camp, 30 km outside of Peshawar. This report presents two main programming recommendations, support for kitchen gardening within the camp, and supporting extremely vulnerable individuals to start small businesses within the camp via small grants and business development training.

Report authors: 
Dee Goluba
Download Report (609.16 KB pdf)

Jalozai Camp, North West Frontier Province
February, 2009

Conflict between the Taliban and Pakistani military forces in the North West Frontier Province, including the Federally Administered Tribal Areas, has led to a mass movement of internally displaced persons to host communities and camps in safer surrounding districts. The overall socio-economic indicators in the IDP camps are dismal, largely due to inadequate health facilities, insufficient education opportunities and poor hygiene and sanitation amenities, compounded with a host of protection issues. This EMMA pilot was conducted to investigate the effect of the IDP crisis on the tomato market system in Jalozai Camp, 30 km outside of Peshawar. Since the crisis, there has been a surge in scavenging for firewood as a source of both fuel and income by IDPs, who have very limited disposable income, with serious environmental implications. This report recommends the promotion of fuel efficient cooking techniques; providing fuel as an incentive for school attendance; and promoting firewood distribution with better environmental protection mechanisms.

Report authors: 
Dee Goluba
Download Report (878.6 KB pdf)

In August and September 2008, Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere was struck by three tropical storms. 86,000 people are now living in temporary shelters. Livelihoods and crops have been destroyed, and the entire road system has been severely damaged. This study was a pilot of the nascent EMMA approach with the dual purpose of better understanding critical market systems (beans and timber) for the population affected by the cyclones and gaining learning that could be used to improve the toolkit itself. The report recommends the direct purchase of timber from regional traders for delivery to beneficiary sites. It may be worth investigating a voucher-system instead of an in-kind distribution, which would need to be supported with trader transportation of timber directly to their households. Also recommended is additional research and cross-checking with the Shelter Cluster, government stakeholders and affected communities. Recommendations for the bean market system include cash-based interventions to increase the purchasing power of target beneficiaries; the provision of local and/or well-adapted bean seeds to farmers in time for agricultural production for the next season and supporting them with vegetable nurseries; the supply of credit to farmers to restore productive assets/infrastructure; the supply of credit to wholesalers whose stores were destroyed; market support activities to improve market system performance and monitoring and phase out of food aid activities.

Report authors: 
Anita Auerbach
Download Report (1.13 MB pdf)

Port au Prince
February, 2010

On January 12, 2010, an earthquake of 7.0 magnitude hit the island of Haiti, approximately 25 km west of Port au Prince. Approximately 692,000 people have been displaced in Port au Prince, many of whom are living in spontaneous urban camps. This EMMA study was conducted about four weeks after the earthquake, focusing on the market system for rice, Haiti's staple food, and the earthquake-affected population in Port-au-Prince. To help restore rice markets while meeting the affected population's food needs, this report recommends ensuring transparency and communication between market actors and the humanitarian community; enhancing market-place security; targeted, diversified food distribution; monitoring market recovery and potential bottlenecks; simultaneous Cash-for-Work and Food-for-Work programs; and unconditional cash transfers to households and most affected market chain actors, particularly small wholesalers.

Report authors: 
not specified
Download Report (471.69 KB pdf)

On January 12, 2010, an earthquake of 7.0 magnitude hit the island of Haiti, approximately 25 km west of Port au Prince. Up to 230,000 people died country-wide in the quake, and another 300,000 were injured. 180,000 to 300,000 households in Port-au-Prince (900,000 to 1.5 million persons) are estimated to have become IDPs as a result of housing destruction. This EMMA study focused on the market system for corrugated galvanized iron, a key material for housing reconstruction. To re-establish a flow along the supply chain ensuring income opportunities and CGI availability at all levels, a multifaceted approach that integrates the following elements is recommended: CGI vouchers to vulnerable households, redeemable at neighborhood hardware retailers; distribution of building material to very vulnerable HH who have limited mobility; cash grants for neighborhood retailers to rehabilitate shops and re-start business activities; facilitating small retailers' access to stocks; and advocating on behalf of market-based interventions to the international community.

Report authors: 
not specified
Download Report (260.77 KB pdf)

On January 12, 2010, an earthquake of 7.0 magnitude hit the island of Haiti, approximately 25 km west of Port au Prince. Up to 230,000 people died country-wide in the quake, and another 300,000 were injured. Approximately 800,000 have been displaced in Port au Prince, many of whom are living in spontaneous urban camps. This EMMA study focused on the construction labor market system in Port-au-Prince. Recommendations for demand-side responses include improving communication to the public on government support for rubble removal,property rights, building permits and zoning; improving access to credit for construction for both households and businesses; and building social housing. Supply-side responses recommended include NGO-run short-term skills trainings targeting future masons, carpenters and electricians; physical rehabilitation of training institutions; capacity building of management, faculty, and staff of training institutions; and organizing apprenticeships and facilitation of trainees' entry into the market. Finally, the report recommends a number of interventions intended to improve job placement services and improving construction-related laws and regulations.

Report authors: 
not specified
Download Report (180.35 KB pdf)

Port au Prince
February, 2010

On January 12, 2010, an earthquake of 7.0 magnitude hit the island of Haiti, approximately 25 km west of Port au Prince. Up to 230,000 people died country-wide in the quake, and another 300,000 were injured. Approximately 800,000 have been displaced in Port au Prince, many of whom are living in spontaneous urban camps. This EMMA study focused on the beans market system in Port-au-Prince. It recommends stimulating demand through cash transfers or vouchers, repairing the port to allow for trade, implementing cash for work projects to repair infrastructure and damaged roads, paying trader debts, transferring cash to farmers for seed purchase and increasing market security. Only if programs to restore the market chain fail should food aid be considered.

Report authors: 
not specified
Download Report (155.47 KB pdf)

On January 12, 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, killing an estimated 222,653 people and wounding an additional 310,000. The Sud-Est (Southeast) department was one of the worst hit areas. This assessment analyzes the market system for beans in the Sud-Est department of Haiti in March-April 2010. Recommended short-term interventions include seed distributions, scaling down food distributions and cash-based programs to improve the buying power of affected households. Longer-term recommended interventions for improving the overall function of the beans market to mitigate future disruptions include laying the foundation for a functioning private-sector seed system, working with existing or new institutions to provide financial services appropriate for agriculture, working with authorities to approve security at key market places and undertaking disaster risk reduction measures such as improving storage and preservation of surplus harvests.

Report authors: 
Laura Meissner, Gerry Delphin, Georges Pierre-Louis, Tim Schwartz, Karri Goeldner Byrne, Gary Bonhomme, and Molière Peronneau
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On January 12, 2010 a magnitude 7.0 earthquake struck Haiti, killing an estimated 222,653 people and wounding an additional 310,000. The Sud-Est (Southeast) department was one of the worst hit areas. This assessment analyzes the market system for agricultural labor in the Sud-Est department of Haiti in March-April 2010. Recommended interventions include immediate cash-for-work projects to replace lost income for rural households; immediate interventions to ensure farmers have sufficient seeds and inputs to plant successfully; and longer-term interventions to stimulate rural employment opportunities and strengthen the agricultural sector.

Report authors: 
Laura Meissner, Karri Goeldner Byrne, Georges Pierre-Louis, Tim Schwartz, Molière Peronneau and Gardy Letang
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This assessment analyzes the stresses placed on the crucial market systems of wheat flour and tomatoes in eastern Libya, following the rise of civil conflict in mid-February 2011. The physical infrastructure and human capital that supports and operates the wheat market system remains entirely functional, while the tomato market system has been affected significantly. Many conflict‐related problems in the tomato market system lend themselves to interventions with which international organizations are familiar: provision of input vouchers, cash for work, crop insurance and debt relief. However, wheat flour has a much greater bearing on food security in eastern Libya than tomatoes. The inability to import wheat is the defining problem affecting the market system, but is caused by political and legal issues beyond the traditional purview of most humanitarian organizations.

Report authors: 
Not specified
Download Report (555.31 KB pdf)

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